In The Cavity of a Rock

In The Cavity of a Rock
Father Lehi

Monday, January 27, 2014

Jaredite Barges and Noah's Ark Revisited Thanks to Recent Findings

Below is an interesting article about a 4000 year old Mesopotamian (modern day Iraq) tablet about the size of a common cell phone written in cuneiform that shares some insights on Noah's ark. It was brought to Irving Finkel curator of the British museum by a man who advised his father had acquired it in the middle east after World War II.  It advises that the ark would have been a round vessel called a coracle as well as giving instructions for the loading of the animals two by two.  Those who are familiar with the story of the Jaredites and their traveling's to the new world in the book of Ether in the Book of Mormon in round dish shaped barges roughly around 2500 B.C. would instantly see the correlation between the two stories and boat/barge construction.  In the past I had done a post that covers this exact subject in more detail and it can be found here.

 http://inthecavityofarock.blogspot.com/2011/05/jaredite-barges-noahs-ark-book-of.html

Although the recent findings may be interesting we must allow time for the examination of this tablet and its authenticity to be verified before jumping to an immediate conclusions.  Here is the original article.

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/british-museum-prototype-noahs-ark-was-round

 

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