In The Cavity of a Rock

In The Cavity of a Rock
Father Lehi

Sunday, November 13, 2011

Ancient history of Mexico tapestry adds even more authenticity to the Book of Mormon

Giron-Gagal Tapestry
There is a tapestry in the Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City that may in fact show some of the migrations of the seven tribes that make up the Nephites and Lamanites. I first came across this document when it was presented in Dr. Jerry Ainsworth's book "The Life and Travels of Mormon and Moroni". If any readers of my blog have not noticed yet I quote this book extensively and recommend it to anyone who is truly interested in learning more about the people and cultures and evidences of the Book of Mormon. On the tapestry in question, as noted by Ainsworth it shows a group of people coming out of the ocean in what appears to be a womb. Anyone familiar with any Native American traditional stories will know that the womb is very common among traditional stories representing the "Mother Culture".

Father Lehi and the Liahona
This tapestry appears to confirm Lehi's landing. The group of people exiting the womb appear to be following a leader who is holding a round object in front of them. The Quiche name for the object in the tapestry is the "Giron-Gagal" which means, "compass" or "director". As Dr. Ainsworth notes the Quiche Maya believe that whoever had the Giron-Gagal could not be defeated in battle because they had the blessings of the Gods. This is very similar to the Biblical story of the Ark of the Covenant that was carried with the Israelites to battle as a sign of bringing the God of Israel along with them to war in which they could not be defeated either. In the Book of Mormon father Lehi was also lead by a round curious object similar to a compass called the Liahona. The Liahona was more than just a compass because it lead according to the faith of those who had it.

The tapestry also shows a group of nine people on turtles leading the group as well. This may represent a few things but I tend to lean towards the real mother group of the ancestors of those who live in Mesoamerica. This would include the Maya and the Olmec civilizations. The group could actually represent the barges of the Jaredites whom many LDS scholars associate with the Olmec civilization. Not that the Jaredites are the Olmecs but that the Olmecs associated with the Jaredites or that the Jaredites may have been part of the Olmec civilization. This same thought process goes for the Nephite and Lamanite civilizations and the Maya. The Nephites and Lamanites are not the Maya but definitely associated with each other and more than likely they were part of the Mayan civilization. Anyway that it is looked upon one cannot ignore the uncanny resemblance of the history told in the tapestry and that of the Book of Mormon.

5 comments:

  1. as noted in the blog post the 9 people on turtles may have been the jaredites because they traveled in barges that were tight like a dish...similar to a turtles shell. The turtle has many representations among the native americans, but I will have to devote another post to that later.

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  2. There's all kinds of cool goodies in that museum from what all I've seen of it on line. Great stuff, Jody! Love your artwork with it!

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  3. thanks Shelli, your right. One of these days when money is no object we will have to go visit some of these ancient sites and museums.

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  4. Oh man, I would so love to! A while ago, I came across a pic on google that was taken at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade of an Indian chief on a turtle shell float. It gave me warm chills.

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  5. Thanks for the blog post, Jody! It has some similarities to the so-called "Genealogy Stone" in El Baul, Guatemala, which shows the seven tribes symbolized in a "U" womb glyph.

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